History

Event

VINCI named operator of the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park Stadium in London

2015

E20 Stadium LLP1 has awarded the service concession contract for the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park Stadium in London to VINCI Stadium, a subsidiary of VINCI Concessions (1st stadium concession outside France). The 25-year contract covers operation, upkeep and maintenance of the stadium and coordination of part of the park around the stadium during the various events.
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Event

Inauguration of the Louis Vuitton Foundation

2014

On Monday 20 October 2014, the Louis Vuitton Foundation was inaugurated in Paris in the presence of Bernard Arnault, chairman of the LVMH Group, French President Francois Hollande, architect Frank Gehry, Xavier Huillard, chairman and CEO of VINCI, and numerous guests. With a net floor area of 13,700 sq. metres, the building is characterized by its 12 huge glass roofs, covering a highly complex structure associating 19 “icebergs” clad with white, ultra-high-performance fibre concrete panels with 47 glazed facades.
Further information

Company

Imtech ICT - Electrix

2014

VINCI finalises the acquisition of Imtech ICT and Electrix
VINCI Energies has finalised the acquisition of Imtech ICT, the information and communication technologies division of Imtech, as well as the acquisition of the Electrix company from McConnell Dowell, a subsidiary of South African group Aveng.
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Management

Pierre Coppey is appointed Chief Operating Officer of VINCI

2014

The Board of Directors decided to appoint Mr Pierre Coppey as Chief Operating Officer of VINCI. He will concentrate on the Group's Concessions business. Mr Pierre Coppey is a graduate of the Strasbourg Institut d'Etudes Politiques and France's National School of Telecommuncations. He began his career in internal and institutional communication for La Poste. He joined the VINCI Group (SGE) in 1992, holding a number of positions before being appointed Director and then Senior Executive Vice-President of VINCI with responsibility for communication, human resources and synergies. At the end of 2007, Pierre Coppey was appointed Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Cofiroute. In July 2009, he was appointed Chairman of VINCI Autoroutes, which groups together ASF, Cofiroute, Escota and Arcour. He has also been President of the Association des Sociétés Françaises d'Autoroutes since 2012 and Chairman of the Aurore non-profit organisation since 2000.
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Event

Acquisition of ANA, the Portuguese airports concession company

2013

VINCI has finalised today the acquisition of ANA, the company that holds a fifty-year concession for Portugal’s 10 airports. This is the final step in the privatisation process that was launched by the Portuguese government and approved by the European Commission in June 2013. In terms of enterprise value, the transaction is worth €3.08 billion.
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Event

New Coastal Road dike on Reunion Island (France)

2013

Jean-Luc Marx, Prefect of La Réunion, and Didier Robert, President of the Réunion Region, are today officially launching construction of the new coastal highway to be built by a consortium made up of VINCI Construction subsidiaries VINCI Construction Grands Projets (lead company) and Dodin Campenon Bernard, Bouygues Construction subsidiary Bouygues Travaux Publics and Demathieu Bard. The 5,400 metre offshore viaduct, France's longest, will connect Saint Denis (the administrative capital of La Réunion) with La Grande Chaloupe.
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Company

ETF

2013

Organisation Eurovia merges its railway activities : ETF
As of 1st January 2013, Eurovia's railway construction and maintenance activities have been brought together within a single company: ETF. In France, seven regional offices will cover all maintenance services, on both the national network and private branch lines. Outside France, ETF is now offering integrated solutions, based on its predecessor companies' 150 years worth of know-how, qualifications and references, in the course of its ongoing activities in Thailand, Egypt, Benin, Venezuela, and, soon, India.

Event

VINCI delivers the "Cité du cinéma"

2012

VINCI Immobilier has delivered the "Cité du Cinéma", a new centre conceived by Luc Besson and dedicated to the “Seventh Art”. Covering all aspects of the French film industry, this complex of 62,000 m2 will, among other things, have 9 film studios, workshops for building film sets, training areas for the Ecole Nationale Supérieure Louis Lumière, a film theatre, an arcade, space for the service sector as well as communal services, shops and a restaurant.
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Event

VINCI and RFF sign contract for Tours-Bordeaux high speed line

2011

Die geplante Hochgeschwindigkeitsstrecke mit 302 km Länge und 38 km Gleisanschlüssen an das bestehende Schienennetz stellt mit 7,8 Milliarden Euro (aktueller Stand) Gesamtinvestition die bisher bedeutendste öffentlich-private Partnerschaft (PPP) im französischen Eisenbahnsektor und eines der weltweit größten Infrastrukturprojekte der letzten zehn Jahre dar.
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Event

VINCI Autoroutes - Duplex A86

2011

VINCI inaugurates the A86 Duplex, the final, western, link of the "super-ring road"
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Event

450 km of pipelines in Papua New Guinea

2010

On 9 December, as part of its liquefied natural gas (LNG) terminal project in Papua New Guinea, Esso Highlands Limited, a subsidiary of Exxon Mobil Corporation, awarded Spiecapag, a subsidiary of Entrepose Contracting (VINCI Construction), the contract for the construction of 450 km of land-based pipelines. Spiecapag will be responsible for the engineering, supplying equipment, and the construction and installation of this infrastructure.
Further information

Event

Aquisition de Cegelec et entrée de Qatari Diar au capital de VINCI

2010

Today, VINCI announces the completion of the transfer to VINCI of the Cegelec group (“Cegelec”) by the Qatari Diar Real Estate Investment Company (“Qatari Diar”), and the allotment to Qatari Diar of 5.78% of VINCI’s capital and theoretical voting rights in the context of this transaction. Integrating solutions and technological services, Cegelec designs, installs and maintains systems and sub-systems in industry, infrastructure and the service sector.
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Event

VINCI acquires Faceo and creates VINCI Facilities

2010

VINCI announces the signature on 29 April 2010 of an exclusivity agreement with APAX Partners SA to acquire Faceo. Faceo is a major player in Europe’s facilities management market. The company provides integrated solutions for service sector maintenance, with activities in engineering, systems integration and multi-service and multi-technical maintenance within the framework of multi-year contracts. With 2,500 employees, Faceo generated revenue of €430 million in 2009, of which 30% outside France.
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Management

Xavier Huillard (Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer since may 2010)

2010

Xavier Huillard, born on 27 June 1954, is a graduate of the École Polytechnique and the École Nationale des Ponts et Chaussées. He has spent most of his working life in the construction industry in France and abroad. He joined Sogea in December 1996 as Deputy Chief Executive Officer in charge of international activities and specific projects, and then became its Chairman and Chief Executive Officer in 1998. He was appointed Deputy General Manager of VINCI in March 1998, and was Chairman of VINCI Construction from 2000 to 2002. He was appointed Co-Chief Operating Officer of VINCI and was Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of VINCI Energies from 2002 to 2004, then Chairman of VINCI Energies from 2004 to 2005. He became Director and Chief Executive Officer of VINCI in 2006 and was appointed Chairman of the Board of Directors on 6 May 2010. He was appointed Chairman of the Institut de l’Entreprise on 18 January 2011.
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Event

Inauguration of A19 motorway between Artenay and Courtenay

2009

VINCI officially opened the A19, France’s first eco-motorway. Built by Group companies and operated by Cofiroute, this 101 km motorway between Artenay and Courtenay completes the outer ring road around the Greater Paris area.
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Event

Eurovia becomes a front-rank player in rail infrastructure

2008

VINCI strengthened its rail sector activity by acquiring Vossloh Infrastructure Services, renaming it ETF-Eurovia Travaux Ferroviaires. The Group participated in the tender for the construction and operation of 303 km of high-speed line between Tours and Bordeaux. At the end of March 2010, VINCI was declared the successful bidder.
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Event

VINCI acquires Soletanche Bachy

2007

VINCI acquires Soletanche Bachy, world leader in special foundations and ground treatment. Soletanche Bachy offers technical expertise acknowledged the world over. In 2009, Soletanche Bachy merges with the Freyssinet Group to create Soletanche Freyssinet, representing an array of brands and technologies that is unrivalled in the world of specialised civil engineering.
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Event

VINCI to acquire Entrepose Contracting

2007

VINCI broadened its range of technical expertise and strengthened its international presence by acquiring Entrepose Contracting (oil and gas infrastructure).
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Event

VINCI Energies signed its first public-private partnership for public lighting with the municipality of Thiers in central France

2006

The city of Thiers in central France has just awarded its public lighting management contract to VINCI Energies under a 15-year public private partnership. A few months later, VINCI Energies and VINCI Concessions won the PPP contract to manage public lighting in the city of Rouen, Normandy.
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Management

Yves-Thibault de Silguy (Chairman from june 2006 to may 2010)

2006

Yves-Thibault de Silguy has a degree in law from the University of Rennes, a Masters degree in public law, and is a graduate of the Institut d’Etudes Politiques Paris, public service section, and of the Ecole Nationale d’Administration. From 1976 to 1981, he worked at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and for the European Commission from 1981 to 1985. He then worked at the French Embassy in Washington as a Counsellor (economic affairs) from 1985 to 1986. From 1986 to 1988, he was an adviser in the Prime Minister’s office with responsibility for European affairs and international economic, monetary and financial affairs. From 1988 to 1993, he was Director in the international affairs department and then Director for International Affairs of the Usinor Sacilor Group. From 1993 to 1995, he was Secretary-General of the Interdepartmental Committee for Questions of Economic Cooperation in Europe and at the same time, adviser for European affairs and vices herpa in the Prime Minister’s office, assisting in the preparation of summits of the industrialised nations. From 1995 to 1999, he was European Commissioner responsible for economic, monetary and financial affairs. From 2000 to 2005, he was Chairman of the European Policy committee of the Medef. In January 2000, he became a member of the Executive Board of Suez Lyonnaise des Eaux, of which he was Chief Executive Officer from 2001 to 2003. He was then Executive Vice-President of Suez from 2003 until June 2006. He was appointed Chairman of the Board of Directors of VINCI on 1 June 2006 and resigned from all his appointments at Suez. Since 6 May 2010, he has been Vice-Chairman and Senior Director of VINCI.

Event

With the acquisition of ASF, VINCI becomes the world’s leading integrated concession/construction group

2005

VINCI was selected by the French government to acquire ASF and Escota as part of the country’s motorway company privatisation programme.

Event

VINCI opened Charilaos Trikoupis Bridge (Rion–Antirion) to traffic.

2004

The 2,252 metre structure, which connects the Peloponnese to mainland Greece, was built by VINCI Construction Grands Projets and is being operated by VINCI Concessions under a 35-year concession contract.

Event

VINCI to restore the Château de Versailles Hall of Mirrors

2003

VINCI became a major partner of France’s Ministry of Culture and started restoration work on the Hall of Mirrors at the Château de Versailles in the country’s biggest skills-based cultural sponsorship operation.

Event

VINCI created the VINCI Foundation for the Community, a bridge between the skills of Group employees and community organisations. Its aim is to promote access to employment and restore social cohesion.

2002

VINCI created the VINCI Foundation for the Community, a bridge between the skills of Group employees and community organisations. Its aim is to promote access to employment and restore social cohesion.
Find out more at: www.fondation-vinci.com

Event

VINCI created VINCI Park

2001

VINCI created VINCI Park, world leader in car parks and associated services.

Worksite

Yaciretá dam

2001

Dumez
Yaciretá, or "cradle of the moon" in Guarani, is located on the Parana river at the northern tip of Argentina and Paraguay. Dumez participated in the construction of this dam, which not only produces power but also allows river transport all the way to Brazil, thanks to elevated upstream water levels. The facility consists of an earth dam seventy kilometres in length, with four main concrete structures: a navigation lock, two spillways, and a hydroelectric plant.

Event

SGE became VINCI

2000

VINCI merged with Groupe GTM

Management

Antoine Zacharias (Chairman of VINCI from 2000 to 2006)

2000

A graduate of engineering school ENSEEIHT, Antoine Zacharias held many management positions at Compagnie Générale des Eaux, where he spent most of his career. He was regional director at Lyon, and in charge of developing and monitoring the group's activities in Germany. He was appointed Deputy General Manager of CCGE in 1994 and member of the Vivendi Executive Board in 1995. Executive manager and Director of SGE since 1991, he was appointed chairman of the group in June 1997. In April 2000, he resigned from Vivendi when the latter reduced its interest in SGE to 17%. He was responsible for the VINCI's merger with GTM in 2000, which made VINCi the world leader in construction, concessions and related services.

Worksite

Georges Pompidou European Hospital

1999

Sogea
Sogea built the shell of the Georges Pompidou European hospital (designed by architect Aymeric Zublena), located in Paris's XVth arrondissement. The 29,000 square metre hospital has a capacity of 687 beds.

Worksite

Jin Mao building

1998

Campenon Bernard
The Jin Mao tower, which rises 420.50 metres over the city of Shanghai, was designed to be the tallest skyscraper with a concrete centre and metal frame. The building counts 88 stories, 88,000 square metres of curtain wall, eight megacolumns surrounding a reinforced concrete core and a 38-metre spire.

Worksite

Stade de France

1998

SGE
The construction of the Stade de France began in 1995, three years before the World Soccer Cup. The site presented many challenges, due to geological conditions, urban surroundings and the short deadline. Three French companies, of which Dumez and SGE, were awarded equal portions of the project. The stadium's subsequent success, and its short, albeit rich history, have been widely recognised. The Stade de France is operated under concession by VINCI.

Worksite

Ting Kau bridge

1998

Freyssinet
The Ting Kau bridge in Hong Kong is 1,117 metres long and is one of the longest cable-stayed bridges in the world. Freyssinet installed 384 cables, plus 64 cables to stabilise the pylons and eight to ensure longitudinal stability (the latter were nearly 500 metres long). The total weight of these cables exceeded 3,000 tonnes.

Worksite

Vasco de Gama bridge over the Tagus in Lisbon

1998

Campenon Bernard
The Vasco de Gama bridge was inaugurated in 1998. The structure, which is 17 kilometres long, includes a main cable-stayed bridge824 metre long, four viaducts, respectively 488 metres, 672 metres, 6,531 metres and 3,825 metres long, an interchange, and a toll-gate/services area. The entire structure is built to resist earthquakes four times stronger than the one that destroyed Lisbon in 1755. The project was managed by Campenon Bernard and is currently operated by VINCI under a concession contract.

Company

Eurovia

1997

Eurovia was created in 1997 from the merger of two major SGE road construction subsidiaries, Viafrance and Cochery Bourdin Chaussé (the latter was the result of the 1984 merger of Cochery and Bourdin Chaussé). In 1999, Eurovia purchased Teerbau, the roadworks leader in Germany. It also launched a major expansion drive in central and eastern Europe. In 2000, VINCI's merger with GTM resulted in the merger of Eurovia and Entreprise Jean Lefebvre, to form the largest roadworks company in Europe.

Company

Soletanche Bachy

1997

The art of foundations is as old as the hills, but its scientific expression, geotechnical engineering, only goes back to the 1920s. As the industrial pioneers of the new discipline, Soletanche and Bachy devised most of the innovations that revolutionised ground technologies. Their merger in 1997 consolidated their leadership in the sector.

Soletanche and Bachy have successfully completed some 60,000 projects, including waterproofing and repair of large dams; nuclear power station protective walls; tunnels for most of the large urban metro systems; very deep foundations for the highest skyscrapers in Asia, Europe and the Middle East; refurbishment of historic landmarks such as the Arc de Triomphe and the Grand Palais in Paris, the Bolshoi Theatre in Moscow and Saint Pancras Train Station in London; major marine works such as Port 2000 in Le Havre, The Palm in Dubai and Al Raha Beach in Abu Dhabi; and a multitude of smaller projects showcasing the skills of our operators, technicians and engineers.

Management

Antoine Zacharias (Chairman of SGE from 1997 to 2000)

1997

A graduate of engineering school ENSEEIHT, Antoine Zacharias held many management positions at Compagnie Générale des Eaux, where he spent most of his career. He was regional director at Lyon, and in charge of developing and monitoring the group's activities in Germany. He was appointed Deputy General Manager of CCGE in 1994 and member of the Vivendi Executive Board in 1995. Executive manager and Director of SGE since 1991, he was appointed chairman of the group in June 1997. In April 2000, he resigned from Vivendi when the latter reduced its interest in SGE to 17%. He was responsible for the VINCI's merger with GTM in 2000, which made VINCi the world leader in construction, concessions and related services.

Management

Jean-Marie Messier (Chairman of SGE from 1996 to 1997)

1996

A graduate of Ecole Polytechnique and Ecole Nationale d'Administration, Jean-Marie Messier began his career as a Finance inspector in 1982. He was successively cabinet chief of the minister in charge of privatisations, technical advisor to the minister of the economy and finance from 1986 to 1999, and associate-manager of the bank Lazard Frères et Cie from 1989 to 1994. Appointed General Manager and Director of CGE (which became Vivendi in 1996), he was named Chairman and CEO of the company until 2002. He was Chairman and CEO of SGE from 1996 to 1997, when it was still a subsidiary of Vivendi.

Worksite

Normandy bridge

1995

Freyssinet
The Normandy bridge, the second longest cable-stayed bridge in the world, with a main span of 856 metres, crosses the Seine estuary linking Le Havre to Honfleur. The bridge is 1,966 metres long and includes two concrete pylons that are 215 metres high.
The bridge's bearing surface is more limited that that of the great suspended bridges. Nonetheless, the Normandy bridge represents a considerable improvement in cable-stayed technology and can withstand winds exceeding 300 kilometres per hour.

Worksite

Société Générale building

1995

CBC
The Société Générale head office building in La Défense, built by CBC, is one of the great office construction projects of the last decade. CBC's Paris-based subsidiary Bateg completed one of the towers, with over 70,000 square metres in office space, in 1995.

Worksite

Channel Tunnel

1994

SGE
xThe inauguration of the Channel tunnel in 1994 marked the end of an exceptional technical and human adventure. The idea dated back to 1802, when Albert Mathieu, an engineer, suggested digging a tunnel to link France to England, but the project did not materialise until France and the UK signed a treaty to this effect in 1986.
The tunnel includes three galleries, and is a total of 50.5 kilometres in length, of which 37 kilometres run under the channel, which is fifty metres deep. The terminal installations on the French side cover 520 hectares, i.e. the size of an international airport. Of the five French companies that met this exceptional technical challenge, VINCI is represented through two of its businesses, Dumez and SGE.

Worksite

Canal + head office building

1992

CBC
The Canal+ head office building, designed by Richard Meier, was delivered in 1992 and is representative of a new style of office architecture, that offered flexible internal design on a smaller scale. CBC drew on the full range of its technical skills to complete the project.

Management

Guy Dejouany (Chairman from 1990 to 1996)

1990

A graduate of Ecole Polytechnique and a Ponts et Chaussées engineer, most of Guy Dejouany's career was with CGE (which later became Vivendi). He was successively Deputy General Manager in 1965, General Manager in 1972, General Manager and Director in 1973 and Chairman and CEO from 1976 to 1996. From 1990 to 1996, he was also Chairman and CEO of SGE (at the time, a subsidiary of CGE). He is currently a Director of VINCI.

Worksite

Our Lady of Peace in Yamoussoukro

1990

Dumez
The Yamassoukro cathedral, Our Lady of Peace, was built and financed by President Houphouët-Boigny of Côte d'Ivoire, and cost over one billion French francs. The cathedral is a replica of Saint Peter of Rome. With a surface area of 30,000 meters, it can hold up to 7,000 people seated and 11,000 people standing.

Management

Guy Dejouany (Chairman of the Supervisory Board) and Serge Michel (Chairman of the Executive Board): 1988 - 1990

1988

Worksite

The Grand Louvre Museum

1988

Dumez
Architect Ieoh Ming Pei was commissioned to design the new buildings of the Grand Louvre Museum, which gave rise to one of the largest and most complex museum in the world. Dumez built the underground entrance to the museum, along with restaurants, an auditorium, exhibition rooms, warehouses, a bookstore and the base of Pei's famous glass pyramid.

Worksite

Golfech nuclear power plant

1987

GTM
During the 1950, GTM took part in the French government's power plant construction program. From 1985 to 1987, it added to its project portfolio, by building two cooling towers for the Golfech nuclear power plant in the Tarn department. The cooling towers, which stood at 178.5 metres, were the tallest in the world.

Worksite

Homes in Singapore

1987

GTM
To remedy a severe housing shortage, Singapore launched a large-scale policy, in which GTM was actively involved, through the construction of 15,000 homes between 1981 and 1987. To honour the contract, GTM first had to build an exceptionally large prefabrication plant.

Management

Pierre Léon-Dufour (1937-2001)

1986

Pierre Léon-Dufour was born in 1937 in Tarbes. A graduate of Ecole Nationale des Ponts et Chaussées, he was employed by GTM when the group decided to launch a new business: parking lots. Pierre Léon-Dufour played a key role in the development of Parcs GTM, GTM's parking division, which he managed from 1986 to 1996,. He was also active in representing the profession and founded business organisation SYNOPARC (Syndicat National des Concessionnaires de Parcs Publics de Stationnement).

Worksite

The new town of Khashm-Al-Aan

1986

Dumez
Khashm-Al-Aam was just another patch of desert in the suburbs of Riad, Saudi Arabia, when the National Guard decided to build its largest military base there in 1981. The Saudi government launched a giant construction project to build housing for the families of officers and enlisted men. In less than five years, Dumez built a city for 50,000 people, including 5,200 homes and 143 public buildings over an area of 1,640,000 square metres.

Worksite

La Villette Science and Technology Park in Paris

1985

GTM
After the Pompidou Centre, GTM won another major project management contract that also involved modernising the architecture of Paris. This time, the group was en charge of building the La Villette Museum of Science and Technology. In 1974, just a few years after the closure of the La Villette abattoirs, GTM began works to develop 55 hectares of industrial wasteland.

Management

Serge Michel (Chairman from 1984 to 1988)

1984

Serge Michel spent his entire career in the building and civil engineering sector. In 1951, he joined SEAS and became manager of Etablissements Houdry in 1955. In 1967, he joined Saint-Gobain as sales manager and then chairman of Socea. At Saint-Gobain, he was successively deputy general manager and general manager of the services branch. He was appointed Chairman of SGE from 1984 to 1988 and Chairman of the Executive Board from 1988 to 1990. He was deputy general manager of CGE from 1991 to 1992. He is currently chairman of Soficot, and is still active in the building and civil engineering sector, notably as Director of VINCI.

Company

CBC

1982

CBC (Campenon Bernard Construction) was founded in 1982 by two former Bouygues managers, Henri Becq et Gilbert Simonet, with the support of parent company Campenon Bernard, which wanted to develop building activities. CBC began by bringing together Campenon Bernard's construction subsidiaries, then developed real estate activities and moved into international markets. This policy immediately paid off, and by the end of the 1980s, CBC was among the five leading French companies in the sector.
CBC has three main features: thanks to its research and real estate divisions, it counts as many managers and technicians as workers; it played a pioneering role in Europe, especially in former Czechoslovakia, where it acquired a foothold as early as 1986 (with the hotel forum in Bratislava); lastly, CBC often works with prominent architects, like Richard Meier, who designed the Canal+ head office building, and Ricardo Bofill, responsible for the Swift head office building in Belgium. In 1997, CBC's activities were merged with SGE's other construction businesses within Campenon Bernard.

Management

Gilbert Simonet (1932-1998)

1982

After graduating in civil engineering, Gilbert Simonet joined Bouygues in 1960 and remained with the company until the creation of CBC in 1982. Simonet, initially hired by Bouygues as a works manager, was later assigned to property and construction activities. An influential member of the construction industry like his partner Henri Becq, through CBC, he tried to show that construction "is mostly a question of brains".

Management

Paul Naudo (Chairman from 1981 to 1984)

1981

Worksite

Uranium road

1980

Bourdin et Chaussé
Bourdin et Chaussé has been present in Africa since the early 1950s. In Niger, it took part in the construction of the Uranium road from Tahoua to Arlit with Fougerolles, another French company. Both the country and the company benefited from this project, which linked urban centres in the southwest and northwest.

Worksite

1980

Campenon Bernard

Management

Raymond Soulas (Chairman from december 1979 to july 1980)

1979

Raymond Soulas, born in Paris on 18 October 1918, was educated at the Lycée Saint-Louis and the Ecole Polytechnique. During the occupation he was deported to Buchenwald. In 1943 he joined SGE as chief engineer and in 1960 was made Managing Director of Tramarance, the company responsible for civil engineering at the La Rance tidal power plant (1960-1967). In 1971, he was named Executive Vice-President and in 1977 Board member and Managing Director of SGE. He was Chairman and CEO of SGE from December 1979 to July 1980. He was Chairman and CEO of Sea Tank Co. from its inception and held the same positions at SGE-TPI. Instrumental in the Sainrapt et Brice merger, he became its Vice-Chairman and CEO in 1979. A year later he was appointed Vice-Chairman and CEO of SGE. Following the acquisition by Saint-Gobain, he remained on the board but retired from all his other positions in 1988.

Worksite

Brotonne bridge

1977

Freyssinet
The Brotonne bridge, built in 1977, marked a decisive stage in the construction of cable-stayed bridges with prestressed concrete aprons.
The structure is 1,278.4 metres long and comprises a cable-stayed bridge with three spans, respectively 143.5 metres, 320 metres and 143;5 metres long. The apron is 3.8 metres high throughout its length and includes two throughways 6.5 metres wide, a central separation 3.2 metres wide, and two sidewalks 1.5 metres wide.

Worksite

Cabora Bassa dam

1976

GTM
The construction of the Cabora Bassa dam over the Zambeze river turned out to be one of GTM's most difficult projects. The site was beset by external problems, including the strength of the river's flow, as well as acts of sabotage and guerrilla warfare. Ten thousand people worked on the structure, which is 165 metres high and 320 metres long.

Worksite

Georges Pompidou Centre in Paris

1976

GTM
The Pompidou Centre in Paris was designed by Renzo Piano and Richard Rogers and built by GTM. The centre is undoubtedly one of the most striking buildings of the latter half of the XXth century in Paris, though the public initially had trouble accepting the huge structure's presence in one of the oldest districts of Paris. The building's high-tech architecture is currently home to a library and to the national museum of modern art.

Worksite

The Montreal Olympics Park

1976

Freyssinet
Freyssinet was actively involved in the construction of the Olympic complex in Montreal for the 1976 games. The group notably built the velodrome, for which it designed a unique off-centre roof structure supported by four buttresses and 200 flat cylinders, 920 mm in diameter with around 1,000 tonnes of thrust each.

Worksite

Water treatment works in Lagos

1976

Sogea
In response to exponential demographic growth since the 1970s, the authorities of Lagos in Nigeria launched a number of major infrastructure programmes.
The company later to be known as Sogea was a key player in African markets and was able to demonstrate its expertise in this area.

Management

Pierre-Donatien Cot (Chairman from 1975 to 1981)

1975

Chairman of SGE from 1975 to 1981

Worksite

Montparnasse tower

1973

Campenon Bernard
At 210 metres, the Montparnasse tower, designed by architects Eugène Beaudouin, Urbain Cassan and Louis Hoym de Marien, provides a striking contrast to the architecture of central Paris. When it was first built, the tower was fiercely criticised and its style generally considered inappropriate, yet it reflects changes in office design. With its smoked-glass façade, the Montparnasse tower ushered in an era of vast, open-plan offices.

Event

Creation of GTIE, under the name Union des Entreprises Electriques Régionales (UEER)

1972

The United Kingdom and Ireland join the EEC (European Union)

Company

GTIE

1972

GTIE, the VINCI group's Energy and Information division, was created in 1972 under the name Union des Entreprises Electriques Régionales (UEER). It was designed to bring together three long-standing, recognised companies in the electrical sector: MJB (the result of from the merger of Mors with Jean Bouchon) Garczynski Traploir and Fournié Grospaud. In 1984, Compagnie Générale des Eaux (now called Vivendi) became the sole shareholder of UEER, which changed its name to GTIE. GTIE made several acquisitions. Soon, it included over one hundred companies. The group became leader in France in electrical engineering.
In 1996, GTIE became a direct subsidiary of SGE, and was expanded to include SDEL and Santerne. With a network of over 700 companies, GTIE is now a leader in Europe in engineering, integration and maintenance of information and energy systems.

Worksite

Hendrik Verwoerd dam

1972

Dumez
On the strength of its reputation in dam construction, Dumez won a contract to build a dam with a record capacity of six million cubic metres in South Africa. Despite the many geographical, technical and human obstacles, Dumez was able to complete the project in 1972.

Company

EMCC

1971

Entreprises Morillon-Corvol et Courbot was created in 1971 from the merger of two companies with strong reputations in maritime works and harbour construction. Morillon-Courvol was founded in 1885 to operate the sand deposits of the Paris region. It played a crucial role in building the Gennevilliers port and in dredging the Seine river to make it navigable by larger vessels.
Courbot dates back to 1925 and was also very active in the Paris area, though its main markets were France's colonies and overseas territories.
The two companies merged in 1971 under the name EMCC, which became a subsidiary of SGE in 1983 and was integrated into Campenon Bernard.

Company

Viafrance

1971

Viafrance, created in 1971, inherited the expertise and culture of two roadwork companies, Vialit and Viasphalte.
Vialit was founded in 1925 under the impetus of Georges Courtois, who wanted to promote surface coatings and bitumen emulsions. Until 1970, the company was managed by Lionel Ignace, co-founder of USIRF (the French Union of Roadworks Companies) in 1936.
Viasphalte was created in 1933, under the impetus of Entreprises Léon Ballot. After the second world war, it became a subsidiary of Campenon Bernard. Viasphalte owed its success to thorough knowledge of American technology and equipment. By the 1960s, it enjoyed a strong presence in France and abroad. Viasphalte built a 187-km road from Safi to Aqaba in Jordan.
Vialit and Viasphalte's activities, which were complementary, were combined in 1971. In 1997, Viafrance merged with Cochery Bourdin Chaussé to form Eurovia.

Management

Roger Schulz (Chairman from 1971 to 1974)

1971

Chairman of SGE from 1971 to 1974

Worksite

The Fourvières tunnel in Lyon

1971

Dumez
The construction of the Fourvières tunnel began in 1967 and ended in 1971. The tunnel is 1,853 metres long and is made up of two tubes, with two lanes each. Since it opened, the structure has become a major throughway for the city of Lyon. Some 81,000 vehicles use it daily.

Event

Creation of the company

1970

Death of Charles de Gaulle

Company

Cofiroute

1970

In 1970, France had just 1,000 km of motorways. To accelerate the development of the French network, without draining public resources, the government decided to tap private financing through concessions. Five public works groups, including SGE, GTM and Jean Lefèvre, took part in the creation of Cofiroute, alongside two banks, Société Générale and Paribas. The financial risks were substantial and the investment did not pay off for over 15 years. Since 1970, Cofiroute has built over 800 km of motorways in western France, including the Paris-Poitiers link (A10), the Paris-Le Mans link and the Angers-Nantes link (A11). In 1988, it also launched the first motorway radio station, Autoroute FM (107.7). A 65% subsidiary of VINCI, Cofiroute is now present in Europe, North and South America and has acquired a small foothold in Asia.

Management

André Chaufour (1903-1999)

1970

André Chaufour was called in by his brother Pierre to help manage Dumez. André and Pierre were highly complementary. André was very attentive to technological innovation. He was responsible for establishing Dumez's international reputation.

Company

Norwest Holst

1969

Norwest Holst is the result of the merger in 1969 of Holst & Co. with Norwest Construction
Holst & Co., founded in 1918 by a Danish engineer, focused on reinforced concrete structures, whereas Norwest Construction, based in Liverpool as of 1923, was specialised in laying underground cables.
Together, the two companies gave rise to one of the largest building and civil engineering groups in England. In 1991, SGE acquired a controlling interest in Norwest Holst, thereby reinforcing its presence in Europe.

Company

SOGEPARC

1968

Financial company SOGEPARC was created in 1968, probably under the impetus of Spie Batignolles, which, like GTM, was increasingly interested in parking concessions. By 1974, SOGEPARC managed 23 parking lots. By 1987, the number of lots under management had increased to 37 and the company was listed on the stock market. From then on, SOGEPARC recorded robust growth. In 1997, it was the largest underground car park operator in France, with 78 lots under management, and began stepping up activities abroad.
In 1998, following a successful takeover bid, SOGEPARC became part of the SGE group. VINCI's merger with GTM paved the way for the merger of SOGEPARC with Parcs GTM, which led to the creation in 2001 of the world leader in parking concessions: VINCI Park.

Worksite

Construction of the A35 motorway

1968

Entreprise Jean Lefebvre
As early as the 1960s, Entreprise Jean Lefebvre, already a major roadworks player, benefited from the French government's decision to improve motorway infrastructure. In 1970, the company's participation in the creation of Cofiroute, a private concession company, clearly established its leadership

Worksite

Saving Abu Simbel in Egypt

1968

GTM
In 1954, Nasser decided to build the Aswan dam that would flood the great Nubian temples. Under the aegis of UNESCO, an international initiative to save the temple of Abu Simbel, sanctuary of Ramses II, was launched. GTM took part in the project that consisted in dismantling the great rock temple and reconstructing it 65 metres above Lake Nasser, before it was submerged, once and for all.

Worksite

La Rance tidal power plant

1966

SGE
The old idea of building a tidal power plant on the Rance estuary finally took shape in 1955. SGE engineers played an active role in the project, which involved cutting through the estuary. Problems, including erosion and tidal swell, built up through the duration of the works, but the civil engineering was completed when General de Gaulle inaugurated the plant on 26 November 1966.

Worksite

Oleron viaduct

1966

Campenon Bernard
In 1966, Campenon Bernard engineers opened the longest viaduct in France to traffic. The viaduct connected Oleron Island in the Charentes region to the mainland. The structure is 2,862 metres in length. Its apron breaks down into 46 spans, 26 of which project by 79 meters and 16 by nearly 40 metres. x

Management

André Balency-Béarn (1900-1978)

1965

A graduate of Ecole Centrale and a native of the Béarn region, André Balency-Béarn is a emblematic figure in France in the area of prefabricated structures. Balency-Béarn was obsessed with reforming archaic French practices and travelled to the United States to learn new technologies. His dream was to apply the methods of automobile manufacturing to the building sector. Despite mixed results, the Balency prefabrication method soon spread throughout Europe and the United States. By the end of the 1960s, however the myth of standardised construction had been abandoned.

Worksite

Choisy-le-Roi bridge

1964

Campenon Bernard
Campenon Bernard used one of its most innovative techniques to build the Choisy-le-Roi bridge. The structure consists of a prestressed concrete apron and of two piles resting on the river bed. The company employed a technique that had never been used before and that involved the use of a synthetic resin to bind the voussoirs together, an ingenious method that was soon copied by competitors. The site was completed in 1964.

Worksite

Gladesville bridge

1964

Freyssinet
Having launched an international expansion drive, Freyssinet won a contract in 1964 to carry out a study on the Gladesville bridge in Sydney Australia. Today, the bridge no longer holds the world record for bearing surface, with a projection of 305 metres, but it is still a structure that is emblematic for the city of Sydney.

Worksite

The Autoroute du Nord

1964

Viafrance
The construction of the northbound motorway from Paris marked an important step in French regional planning and gave Viafrance the opportunity to maximise its expertise. The company also demonstrated high productivity levels.

Company

Parcs GTM

1963

In the early 1960s, Paris was the first French city to be confronted with exponential growth in automobile traffic and an acute shortage of parking spaces The Paris authorities decided to promote the construction of underground parking lots through concession contracts. In 1963, GTM won the first tender to build and operate a parking lot beneath the Invalides esplanade. This was the beginning of Parcs GTM. The following year, the group won a new contract to build a lot under avenue George V.
Until 1970, the market was limited to Paris, but in the 1970s, several new parking concessions were created in the provinces, in cities like Toulon and Nancy. In the 1980s, under the impetus of Pierre Léon-Dufour, Parcs GTM won new concessions in Paris, before branching out into international markets. VINCI's merger with GTM paved the way for the merger of Parcs GTM with Sogeparc, the other historical player. Vinci Park, the world leader in parking lots managed under concession, was created in 2001.

Worksite

Roadworks in Côte-d'Ivoire

1963

Entreprise Jean Lefebvre
The independence of France's former colonies in black Africa did not result in any loss of market share for Entreprise Jean Lefebvre. On the contrary, the group's companies were very active in Guinea under Sékou Touré, and in Côte d’Ivoire under Félix Houphouët-Boigny. Jean Lefebvre adapted smoothly to the new geographical and political realities.

Worksite

Shell Lavéra-Berre oil pipeline

1963

Sogea
In 1963, Sogea took part in the construction of the Lavéra-Berre-St-Auban oil pipeline. Sogea built 22.5 kilometres of the pipeline, which was 124 kilometres long upon completion in 1968.

Worksite

Menjil dam

1962

Campenon Bernard
In the early 1950s, Campenon Bernard was looking for new, more buoyant international markets. The company acquired a foothold in Iran, where it built the Menjil dam on the Sefid Rud in northwestern Iran. The dam was constructed using independent buttresses and was one of the largest of its kind at the time: 106 metres in height and 430 metres in ridge length.

Worksite

Dokan dam

1958

Dumez
Dokan dam was built between 1953 and 1958 in disastrous circumstances, which included a flood of the Tigris river, the Suez crisis, and revolution in Iraq. Yet Dumez successfully overcame all of these obstacles and delivered the structure, which is 116 metres high and 360 metres wide at the ridge, in 1958. The project was a source of considerable prestige for the company managed by the Chaufour brothers.

Worksite

Havana tunnels

1958

GTM
To relieve traffic congestion in Havana and enable the city to free up new urban spaces, GTM proposed to build a tunnel that proved far less expensive than the bridge solution recommended by US competitors. The structure was 1,600 metres long and was completed using five pre-stressed concrete caissons, which were more resistant than the weighted metal caissons used in the United States. This was demonstrated when a tidal wave in early 1958 had virtually no impact on the project. On the strength of this success, GTM signed another similar contract with the Cuban city.

Worksite

Savines bridge

1958

GTM
The Savines bridge, over the Serre-Ponçon reservoir in the Hautes-Alpes department, was built in just twenty months, from 1958 to 1960. Building the bridge, which is 924 metres long, involved installing twelve separate elements, which each consisted in a pile constructed using sliding formwork and no fixed scaffolding (each pile being of a different height), and two brackets built by cantilevering, one voussoir at a time.

Management

René Gonon (1906-2001)

1957

René Gonon was born in 1906. He studied at the Lycée Ampère in Lyon, and later at Ecole Polytechnique and Ecole des Ponts et Chaussées. His first job was with the national railway authority, SNCF, where he was in charge of the North region. He did not join GTM until 1951. He was appointed chairman six years later in 1957 until 1972. His influence continued long after that. Gonon had a gift for innovation and his actions were guided by team spirit, trust and frankness.

Worksite

Lake Pontchartrain bridge

1956

Freyssinet
By 1956, STUP (the future Freyssinet) had established a strong reputation in civil engineering structures. The State of Louisiana chose Eugène Freyssinet's company to play a consulting role on the construction of the longest bridge in the world. The spans for this 38-kilometre bridge, were prefabricated on shore. The bridge crossed the Lake Pontchartrain wildlife reserve.

Worksite

Nebeur dam

1955

Dumez
The Nebeur dam, located on the Mellegue river, is 71 metres high and 470 metres wide and was built between 1949 and 1955. To build the dam, Dumez experimented with a system of self-sliding formwork. The project established the company's reputation once and for all.

Worksite

Alsace canal

1954

Deschiron
As of 1945, Deschiron took part in the construction of major hydraulic and thermal plants ordered by EDF. In the early 1950s, it played a major role in building a hydroelectric power plant at Gerstheim falls in the Bas-Rhin region. The project included the construction of a dock wall and of a factory that was later used by Rhône Poulenc.

Worksite

Improvement of Bin-el-Ouidane

1954

SGE

Worksite

Caracas viaducts

1952

Campenon Bernard
In the 1950s, Campenon Bernard won many contracts in Latin America, especially in Venezuela. On of its most spectacular achievements in the country is the viaducts connecting the capital city Caracas to La Guaira harbour. At the time, the structures' arches were the largest ever built in South America.

Company

SATOM

1951

In 1951, Sainrapt et Brice took over Travaux Afrique. The latter was initially based in Senegal, but soon expanded into Mauritania, Guinea, Togo, Benin and Niger. Travaux Afrique was present in construction, drilling and civil engineering. In 1967, it bought out Sofratom, which had been present in Africa since 1949, and formed SATOM. In the 1970s, the new company was awarded prestigious projects such as the Arlit mining complex, the Japoma rail bridge in Cameroon, and the Saudi embassy in Chad. As a subsidiary of Sainrapt et Brice, it reported 1979 sales that were equal to 70% of the parent company figure. SATOM was one of the biggest assets contributed by Sainrapt et Brice in the 1981 merger with SGE. Since 1984, the company has developed close ties with Sogea and plays a major role in Africa, particularly in roadworks.

Worksite

Couesque dam

1951

SGE

Worksite

Dam on the N'Zilo river

1951

CFE
Belgian group CFE was particularly active in developing the Belgian Congo until the country's independence in 1960. From 1945 to 1955, business in the country was brisk. The dam near Kolwezi is one of the major projects carried out to modernise the country's infrastructure and facilitate mining.

Worksite

Building in Algiers

1950

Dumez
Dumez's subsidiary in Algeria has been present in the country since 1941 and has benefited from strong demand in the construction sector. It notably constructed several buildings for Shell, for the public housing office in Oran and for the Algerian electricity and gas utility.

Worksite

Galion bridge in Rio de Janeiro

1949

Freyssinet
The Galion bridge in Rio de Janeiro was one of the first vertical lift bridges that established prestressed concrete as the preferred material. Compared with ordinary reinforced concrete, prestressed concrete structures involve cables. The structures are therefore lighter and can project further. Comparable structures in reinforced concrete would collapse under their own weight.

Worksite

Génissiat dam

1949

SGE
Construction of the Génissiat dam began in 1939, but the works slowed considerably during the war. When the project was finally completed in 1949, it was the largest hydroelectrically complex in Europe, including a gravity dam 103.7 metres high, a 53 million cubic metre reservoir, and a power plant that was already producing 1.55 billion kWh in 1949. The Génissiat project is a reference. It combined high productivity with progressive social policies, including the construction of worker housing, the development of sanitary services, and the support of cultural and sports activities.

Management

Jean Matheron (Chairman from 1947 to 1971)

1947

Jean Matheron has graduate from Ecole Polytechnique and Ecole nationale des Ponts et Chaussées. He married the eldest daughter of Alexandre Giros, co-founder of SGE. In 1931, he became a member of the Board of Directors and, after World War II, he replaced Henri Laborde-Milaa as chairman. He remained chairman of the company for nearly a quarter of a century and worked to promote its reputation, while embodying the spirit of the founding family. His policies were guided by great financial caution, as reflected in his refusal to record work that was not actually completed in the balance sheet.

Worksite

Dunkirk bridge

1947

Sainrapt et Brice
The port of Dunkirk was seriously damaged during World War II and had to be rebuilt after the liberation of France, which began by treating its wounds, before launching a modernisation programme.

Company

Chantiers Modernes

1946

Chantiers Modernes was created in 1946 by former resistance fighter Hubert Touya. From the start, the company enjoyed strong growth. Specialised in earthmoving, Chantiers Modernes soon moved into civil engineering. The company was involved in several projects submitted by EDF, as well as roadworks, and various construction sites in Africa. In 1988, Dumez acquired an interest in the company, which refocused on metropolitan France. Today, Chantiers Modernes is a subsidiary of GTM Construction, and is present essentially in the Ile-de-France region.

Management

Hubert Touya (1907-1983)

1946

A native of the Béarn region and a fondateur of Chantiers Modernes, Hubert Touya was a graduate of l'Ecole des Mines. After the French defeat in 1940, he joined the Resistance. He was arrested in February 1944, tortured and imprisoned at Neungamme and Ravensbrück until the liberation of the camps.
In 1946, he founded Chantiers Modernes, a company that took part in the country's reconstruction and modernisation.

Company

SICRA

1944

In 1944, anticipating on the reconstruction needs of post-war France, MM. Raimond and Metrich, architects in Lyon, founded Société Industrielle de Constructions Rapides (SICRA). After carrying out several emergency construction projects, the company began work on standardised housing projects. Unable to develop fast enough on its own, SICRA became part of SGE in 1954 and spearheaded SGE's construction activities. In a 1960s advertisement, SICRA made the following claim: "SICRA can give you the building you need in just 90 days. Just choose from our stock of prefabricated units". A close partner of the French national education authorities in the Paris area, SICRA was integrated into SGE subsidiary Sogea in 1986. Within Sogea, SICRA is a leader in the Paris market and has continued to expand in the renovation, housing and services sectors.

Event

Edmé Campenon and Eugène Freyssinet create STUP (Société Technique pour l'Utilisation de la Précontrainte), which will later become Freyssinet.

1943

Alain Turing establishes the theoretical principles of the computer.

Company

Freyssinet

1943

Created to market prestressed concrete (1943-1962)
Freyssinet was founded in 1943 under the name Société Technique pour l’Utilisation de la Précontrainte (STUP). Edme Campenon, the founder of Campenon Bernard, wanted to apply the patents for prestressed concrete filed in 1928 by Eugène Freyssinet. Prestressed concrete is reinforced concrete whose performance is enhanced by built-in stress, which offsets the external stress the concrete is subjected to. The new process, which allowed for substantial savings in steel and concrete, proved extremely useful in France during the reconstruction period that followed World War II. In just a few years, STUP became a recognised specialist in the construction of bridges and runways, but the company's performance was largely driven by Eugène Freyssinet exceptional creativity.

Breaking into international markets (1963-1981)
In the early 1960s, STUP lost its founder and faced increased competition in prestressed technology. The company overcame these difficulties by accelerating expansion abroad, as reflected in the change of name from STUP to Freyssinet International in 1976. Innovation, as demonstrated by the Rio-Niterio bridge in Brazil, and the Montreal Olympics centre, remained a key value for Freyssinet International engineers and a major asset.

Global leadership (1982-2000)
In the early 1980s, Freyssinet experienced problems and was forced to divest some of its foreign subsidiaries. The company's technological expertise continued to be highly valued and the company eventually recovered its momentum. Projects such as the Normandy bridge in France, the Vasco de Gama bridge in Portugal, Cardiff stadium in the United Kingdom, and the Hibernia platform off Newfoundland all represent spectacular achievements that make Freyssinet the world leader in specialised civil engineering.

Management

Jean Lefebvre (born in 1913)

1940

Jean Lefebvre was the son of Charles Lefebvre, the founder of a roadworks company. Jean joined his father's business Salviam in 1938, while studying for a doctorate in law, which he defended in 1941. At his father's death in 1940, he became head of Compagnie Industrielle des Fillers, which he renamed Entreprise Jean Lefebvre, and was then appointed head of Salviam. He remained chairman until 1971. He held numerous honorific positions with the Paris Chamber of Commerce as well as the national association of legal experts.

Company

CAPAG CETRA

1938

CAPAG CETRA, founded in 1938 by Louis Ducatel under the name Entreprise Moderne de Canalisation, is a prime example of successful diversification from pipe systems to large infrastructure. After World War II, the company won major pipe installation contracts in the Paris area and the north of France. In 1953, it was in charge of building the Paris-Le Havre pipeline, a vital structure for the development of the Paris area. CAPAG CETRA also specialised in laying pipes under rivers in France and in Algeria. In the 1960s, it started developing a construction and civil engineering division to handle contracts for the Montereau and Porcheville power plants. In 1975, following the retirement of founder Louis Ducatel, CAPAG CETRA merged with Campenon Bernard.

Management

Ernest Weyl (Chairman from March 1937 to July 1937)

1937

A graduate of Ecole Polytechnique from the Alsace region, Ernest Weyl began his career with a state-owned industrial company before joining the General Tobacco Office of the Ottoman Empire. Noticed by Louis Loucheur, he became a key player at the Ministry of Armament and, as of 1922, he was appointed deputy director of SGE. After the death of Alexandre Giros in March 1937, Ernest Weyl became chairman of SGE for a short period until his own death on the 1st of July 1 of the same year.

Management

Henry Laborde Milaa (Chairman from 1937 to 1947)

1937

Born in 1886, Henri Laborde Milaa graduated from Polytechnique in the Ponts et Chaussées corps. Incorporated as an army engineer, he fought at Verdun, where he was badly wounded. He joined SGE in August 1919 as works manager and was noticed by Alexandre Giros, who appointed him General Manager in 1925. Henri Laborde Milaa played a key role in the company's recovery. Appointed deputy director in 1933, he was particularly interested in electricity and established himself as Alexandre Giros's successor. He was appointed Chairman of SGE on 29 September 1937 and it fell to him to manage the company with caution and perspicacity during the war. He gave up his functions in 1947 to Jean Matheron.

Worksite

Roadworks at Etaples in northern France

1935

Cochery
Entreprises Albert Cochery was present in the north of France since its creation and was involved in modernising the local road network. The nearby presence of factories manufacturing tarmacadam made the task easier. Tarmacadam is made from foundry slag, a by-product of the steel mills traditionally based in northern and eastern France.

Management

Pierre Chaufour (1901-1970)

1932

A graduate of Ecole Central, Pierre Chaufour married Alexandre Dumez's only daughter and was hired by his father-in-law as a works foreman. Upon his father-in-law's death, the took control of the company and proved a great leader. Stranded in Algeria in 1942, he joined the Free French. After the liberation of France, he became honorary chairman of the veterans from his division. Pierre Chaufour died in1970 and his brother André succeeded him to head the company.

Worksite

Kembs

1932

GTM
The Kembs project in the Haut-Rhin region was undertaken to improve a section of the Rhine river, in order to produce and distribute electrical power in Alsace. The hydroelectric plant was completed in August 1932. With an average annual output of 850 millions kWh, Kembs is the largest low-fall hydroelectric plant in France.

Worksite

La Truyère

1932

SGE
The Truyère site was one of the most difficult episodes of SGE's early history. The works got underway in 1910 and continued until the eve of World War II. SGE built a factory, the big Sarrans gravity dam (105 metres in height and 220 million in ridge length), and the Bromme hydroelectric complex, generating 68,000 kW of power. Few sites have caused so many serious financial problems. It took all the skill that Alexandre Giros and his successors could muster to get the company out of this predicament.

Worksite

Oued Fodda dam

1932

Campenon Bernard
The Oued Fodda dam was built between 1926 and 1932 for the Algerian bureau of central irrigation. Oued Fodda is a concrete gravity dam, 100 metres in height, 65 metres in width at the base and 182 metres in length at the ridge. Building the dam and its ancillary structures required 320,000 cubic metres of concrete. General view of the structure (21/02/1937)

Management

Gaston Traploir (1889-1968)

1930

The son of a railway inspector, Gaston Traploir trained as an engineer and specialised in reinforced concrete and electricity. Traploir found an ideal partner in André Garczynski. During a trip to the United States in the 1930s, he discovered of Taylorism and decided to apply it to his own company. A talented inventor and shrewd businessman, he updated the company's organisation. He remained chairman until the mid-1960s.

Management

Eugène Freyssinet (1879-1962)

1929

Eugène Freyssinet was born in the Corrèze region and went to school in Paris, at the Lycée Chaptal, and later at Ecole Polytechnique and Ecole des Ponts et Chaussées. After working for the government for nearly ten years, he was active in developing Entreprises Limousin, of which he became a partner. Freyssinet performed amazing technical feats, thanks to his love of innovation.
In 1929, he left Entreprises Limousin because the company was not interested in developing prestressed concrete, which Freyssinet had invented a year earlier. The technology was later developed with the support of Edme Campenon and STUP, a company created to market Freyssinet's invention, through which Freyssinet was able to fully express his talent.

Company

Bourdin et Chaussé

1928

In 1928, Sylvain Bourdin and Louis Chaussé teamed up to create a road construction company, focused mainly on markets in western France. As of 1945, Bourdin et Chaussé, expanded beyond its regional base and successfully moved into Africa, where it built the "road of the sands" in the Sahara, and participated in the construction of the Uranium road in Niger. These projects, some of which were risky, established the company's reputation. In 1977, it became a subsidiary of SGE and merged with Cochery in 1985. The new company, Cochery Bourdin Chaussé, merged with Viafrance in 1997 to form Eurovia.

Management

Louis Chaussé (1897-1980)

1928

Louis Chaussé was the son of a miner who worked in the slate mines of the Anjou region. After World War I, he was hired by roadworks company Gaétan Brun. In 1928, he teamed up with Sylvain Bourdin to create a roadworks company, Bourdin Chaussé. Upon Bourdin's death, Louis Chaussé was left in charge of the company they had created. Chaussé was close to his employees and enjoyed making frequent visits to the sites. He succeeded in making his company a leader in France.

Management

Louis Loucheur (Founder)

1928

Louis Loucheur was born in 1872 to a protestant family based in Roubaix. Like his partner Alexandre Giros, he was a graduate of Ecole Polytechnique and in addition to his professional activities, was very involved in politics. Loucheur was noticed for his organisational talents and his knowledge of the weapons sector and, in 1916, he was appointed Under-Secretary of State in charge of artillery and munitions, a vital job in war time. In 1917, he replace Albert Thomas as Minister of Armament, and gave priority to intensifying production.
At the end of the war, he was appointed Minister of Industrial Reconstruction, then Minister of the Liberated Regions. He played a major role in the settlement of German reparations, though the surrounding dispute led to his resignation in 1922. In 1928, Loucheur, who always supported progressive policies, succeeded in getting the so-called Loucheur law voted. The law called for the construction of 200,000 low-cost housing units over a period of five years. The basis for increased government involvement in the sector was thus established. Louis Loucheur devoted the last years of his life in pursuit of the European ideal, albeit in vain. He died in 1931.

Management

Sylvain Bourdin (1884-1950)

1928

A native of the Anjou region, Sylvain Bourdin studied law before taking over a steamroller company in Angers. A shrewd businessman, he showed little interest for technology but his business acumen and close ties with many Ponts et Chaussé engineers were enough to establish his company's reputation. In 1928, he teamed up with the more technically minded and pragmatic Louis Chaussé. The roadworks company they founded, Bourdin et Chaussé, gradually became a leader in France.

Event

Charles Lefebvre founded Salviam, later to become l'Entreprise Jean Lefebvre

1927

Release of the first talking movie, Alan Crossland's The Jazz Singer.

Company

Entreprise Jean Lefebvre

1927

Originally a family roadworks company, Entreprise Jean Lefebvre's roots go back to 1927, when Charles Lefebvre founded Salviam ("Save the way"). Charles Lefebvre was one of the first to use slag from foundries as ballast. Seven years later, he developed a new type of binder and created a company to manufacture fillers and special binders.
In 1941, Jean Lefebvre, who had already demonstrated a talent for innovation in his father's company, took control of both companies. The following year, the filler and binder company became Entreprise Jean Lefebvre (EJL). In 1944, Jean Lefebvre was awarded a contract by the allied forces to repair Orly airport's runways. In the process, he discovered the efficiency of American equipment.
Upholding the company slogan ("Jean Lefebvre works for you"), EJL helped build modern France and acquired a foothold in Africa, with the Dakar-Kaolak road in Senegal and the Cocoa loop in Côte-d’Ivoire. EJL increased its foothold by taking over two companies, Reveto, and Gaétan Brun.
In the early 1970s, EJL took part in the creation of Cofiroute, demonstrating once again the quality of its roadworks expertise. The group enjoyed strong growth abroad, in Africa as well as in the Middle East.
EJL was restructured in 1981 and came under GTM's control in 1986. EJL continued to develop in France, while expanding in the United States, Canada and Chile. Through GTM, it became a subsidiary of the VINCI group in 2000, and merged with Eurovia.

Company

Cochery

1926

In 1926, Albert Cochery created Entreprises Albert Cochery, specialised in hydrocarbon-based binders for road maintenance. Cochery was present both in the manufacture and implementation of tarmacadam, a blend of foundry slag and tar that was not widely used in France at the time.
From 1945 on, distillation factories declined as natural gas deposits were discovered and the steel industry went in recession. Entreprises Albert Cochery acquired Rol Lister & Cie and modified its strategy to become a modern roadworks company and a manufacturer of new road surfaces.
After the founder's withdrawal in 1969, his successors continued to grow the company and to acquire capital interests in various roadworks businesses
In 1985, following SGE's acquisition of a majority interest in the company, Cochery merged with Bourdin et Chaussé. The new unit, Cochery Bourdin Chaussé, merged with Viafrance in 1997 to form Eurovia.

Company

Santerne

1926

In 1926, Louis Santerne opened a small electrician's shop in Arras. The business did not truly play a significant role until 1949, under the leadership of the founder's son. During the post-war boom, Santerne's growth was driven by railway contracts, the reconstruction of water towers and demand for new power lines from electrical utility EDF. Santerne, specialised in the installation of electrical equipment in France, became part of SGE in 1996. The company is currently a subsidiary of GTIE.

Company

Travaux du Midi

1926

Travaux du Midi was created in Marseille in 1926, under the name Bertagnol et Compagnie. In 1934, Travaux du Midi became part of Grands Travaux de Marseille (GTM), but kept its family organisation. The company did not truly take off until 1961, with the end of the Algerian war and the return to France of European families living in Algeria, who needed new homes and infrastructure. To meet surging demand, Travaux du Midi began to industrialise manufacturing processes. The company was proud of its success in carving out strong positions throughout the south of France. By the early 1980s, it was present from Bordeaux to Nice. An innovative, dynamic company, Travaux du Midi is part of GTM Construction, a subsidiary of the VINCI group.

Management

Albert Cochery (1898-1981)

1926

Albert Cochery was born in the north of France and lost his parents at a young age. He distinguished himself in World War I, by providing the military staff with vital information. In 1926, he founded Entreprise Albert Cochery, which used by-products from the steel industry, such as slag from the steel foundries, to make tarmacadam. This simple but brilliant idea fuelled the company's growth and made Albert Cochery an emblematic figure of the profession.

Company

Caroni

1925

Caroni was founded in 1925, when Jean Caroni, a former GTM engineer, decided to create his own company in the north of France. Under his helmsmanship, Caroni became a specialist in pile driving and sheeting and earthmoving works. During the post-war reconstruction period, the company built the Don-Sainghin lock, one of the largest in France at the time. In 1950, it rebuilt the Denain lock. After that, it developed other construction activities, becoming a construction specialist in the process. CBC acquired the company in 1983.

Company

Fournié Grospaud

1925

In 1925, Raymond Fournié and Henri Grospaud teamed up to create Fournié-Grospaud, a company based in Tarbes. Until 1945, the company worked almost exclusively on providing electrical power to the railways of southern France. After the war, electrical utilities were nationalised and the company was forced to diversify. While Fournié-Grospaud's main customers remained the national utility EDF and the railway authority SNCF, the company began offering maintenance contracts. In 1970, Fournié-Grospaud teamed up with Garczynski Traploir and Mors Jean Bouchon, within a holding company called UEER, from which GTIE (Générale de Travaux et d’Installation Electrique) was created. Fournié-Grospaud became part of SGE through GTIE in 1996.

Worksite

Supplying Bonewith water from the Bou Redine river

1925

Sogea
In the 1930s, France's North African colonies saw the installation of several pipe networks. Eau et Assainissement (the future Sogea) was involved in a major project on the Bou Redine river to supply Bone in Algeria.

Management

Lionel Ignace (1900-1997)

1924

Lionel Ignace helped create Société Française du Vialit, alongside Georges Courtois in 1924 and was put in charge of the company in 1955.
Lionel Ignace is also a great figure of the roadworks industry, through his activities within the business organisations in the sector. He is co-founder of the union of roadworks syndicates in France. He was elected chairman of the syndicate of roadworks entrepreneurs in France in 1953 and was later appointed honorary vice-chairman of the national federation of civil engineering.

Worksite

The Voulzie river

1923

Sogea
Works on the Voulzie river represented a key water treatment project for the Paris area. Construction began in the 1920s and 1930s. This technical success established Eau et Assainissement, the future Sogea and a subsidiary of Pont-à-Mousson at the time, as one of the major French specialists in the sector.

Company

Froment Clavier

1922

Founded in 1922, Froment Clavier was specialised in the construction of grain silos made from reinforced concrete. At the time, Grands Moulins de Paris was one of its main clients. In its search for new outlets, Froment Clavier started exporting its technology to the French colonies. The company also took part in the construction of subsidised housing, according to the wishes of Louis Loucheur. To meet the needs of post-war France, the company diversified into new areas, from housing to industrial construction, and urban infrastructure, while retaining close ties to the flour mills. In the early 1980s, the company had problems modernising its business and finding new clients. Limited to small-scale projects, Froment Clavier was acquired by Campenon Bernard in 1964. The Froment Clavier brand was phased out.

Event

Creation of Campenon Bernard

1920

Foundation of the French Communist Party.

Company

Campenon Bernard

1920

1920-1945
Campenon Bernard was created in 1920 by a young engineer, Edme Campenon, and an entrepreneur, André Bernard. The company focused on the construction of railways, industrial buildings, roads, and hydraulic infrastructure. The construction of the Chambon dam in 1927 was its first big success. After initial difficulties, the project became a test site for new, more resistant concrete. As a result, yields improved and output reached a record-breaking one thousand cubic metres a day.
Anticipating new technological developments, Campenon Bernard teamed up with Eugène Freyssinet and gave the latter the opportunity to use prestressing technology in major infrastructure. Just before World War II, Campenon Bernard dominated the civil engineering market. During the war, the company pursued honourable business objectives and took part in the creation of STUP (société technique pour l’utilisation de la précontrainte) to market processes developed by Eugène Freyssinet.
1945-1984
In the post-war period, the group was involved in a number of construction sites in France, the colonies and other countries. Wherever it went, Campenon Bernard provided ingenious and innovative technical solutions as shown by projects such as the Marcoule nuclear power plant and the Choisy-le-Roi bridge. In 1962, however, the virtuous cycle ended with the death of Edme Campenon and Eugène Freyssinet.
The engineers of Campenon Bernard continued to renew the group's expertise, thanks to civil and military engineering contracts and the construction of several bridges as well as the Oléron viaduct. From 1962 to 1970, over half of all bridges in France were the work of Campenon Bernard. Projects such as the Montparnasse tower in Paris and the Montreal subway further raised the group's reputation, in an environment of heightened competition.
1984-2000
In 1984, Compagnie Générale des Eaux took over Campenon Bernard. The company won recognition for the construction of the Jules Verne viaduct in Amiens, where it broke the world record for thrust (15,300 tonnes). Campenon Bernard joined SGE in 1988. Under the name Campenon Bernard-SGE, it was responsible for prestigious projects, such as the Stade de France stadium and the Vasco de Gama bridge in Lisbon.

Company

Garczynski Traploir

1919

Construction engineers André Garczynski and Gaston Traploir met in the trenches of World War I. After the war, they created a company in Le Mans to build electrical networks. The company soon became a leader in western France. In the 1930s, it added water services to its business portfolio.
After world War II, Garczynski Traploir became a subsidiary of Compagnie Générale des Eaux. The company recorded spectacular industrial growth, driven by demand for high-voltage power lines, water towers and power plants.
In 1970, Garczynski Traploir's activities were combined with those of Mors Jean Bouchon and Fournié-Grospaud within a holding company called UEER, which later became GTIE. Garczynski Traploir is specialised in electrical power, information and communication technologies and has continued to develop within GTIE, VINCI's Energy and Information division.

Management

André Garczynski (1888-1944)

1919

André Garczynski's family was originally from Poland and settled in France in the Sarthe region during the Napoleonic wars. Garczynski studied at the Electricity Institute of Grenoble. In 1919, he founded a company with Gaston Traploir. Garczynski was an automobile lover. He was also very interested in social issues and was actively involved in the creation of Caisses d'Assurances Sociales, ancestor of the French public health insurance system. In 1940 he stayed behind in Le Mans to look after his company. He was arrested by the Gestapo in 1943 and deported to Buchenwald, where he died a year later.

Management

Charles Rebuffel (1861-1942)

1917

Born in a family of Marseilles traders, Charles Rebuffel joined GTM after graduating from Ecole Polytechnique and Ecole des Ponts et Chaussées. At GTM, he was in charge of building a sewage system for the city of Marseille. Thanks to the success of this first project, he soon became key player at GTM and was eventually appointed chairman from 1917 to 1940.
An influential player in the electricity sector, he sat on the boards of several businesses and chaired five companies, though GTM was always his main concern. Thanks to the help of his managers, he organised the group into a powerful network of subsidiaries and industrial holdings.

Company

CEGELEC

1913

Cegelec's history is closely linked to the development of the electricity and energy sectors in France and Europe. It has its roots in the creation of the French CGEE (Compagnie Générale d'Entreprises Electriques) in 1913. From success to expansion, the company has become an international group providing technological services to companies and public authorities.  
 
 
1913 
Creation of the CGEE, holding of electrical companies, in order to install and build electricity networks, lines, substations and power plants necessary for France's electrification. 
 
1971 Formation of CGEE Alsthom, after the takeover in 1967 of the SGE (Public works and civil engineering, construction, industrial works, electricity services). This was Europe's largest electrical engineering company, with 13,000 employees and sales of almost one billion French francs. 
 
1989 
GEC (General Electric Company) acquired a 24,50% stake in CGEE Alsthom and transferred its industrial control businesses to this company. CGEE Alsthom changed its name to Cegelec. 
 
1998/2000 
Cegelec was bought by Alstom and became afterwards Alstom Contracting. 
 
2001
Alstom Contracting was acquired by its managers and employees in a LMBO (leverage management buy-out) with the backing of financial institutions and was renamed Cegelec. A second LMBO took place in 2006. 
 
2008
Qatari Diar, a global actor in Real Estate Development and Investment, a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Qatar Investment Authority, acquired Cegelec. 
 
14 April 2010
  Entry into force of the strategic partnership between Qatari Diar and VINCI. Cegelec becomes a wholly-owned VINCI subsidiary.

Management

Edmé Campenon (1872-1962)

1910

Edmé Campenon came from an old aristocratic family, who intended him to study at Ecole Polytechnique. Instead, he chose to enlist in the Army as a private and to see the world. In 1910, he entered the civil engineering sectorand ten years later, founded Campenon Bernard, with André Bernard, a young engineering graduate of Arts et Métiers. The success of the venture is due to the quality of the Campenon-Bernard teams, the talent of Eugène Freyssinet, and Edmé Campenon's many relations. Campenon remained chairman of Campenon Bernard until 1958.

Company

Balency et Schuhl

1909

Balency et Schuhl was founded in 1909 by MM.Canal and Schulh, pioneers in reinforced concrete technology known for the unusually solid framework they used to build the Georges V hotel in Paris. André Balency-Béarn took over the company's management as of 1935. Balency et Schulh took part in the construction of the CNIT conference centre in La Défense. It also focused on heavy prefabrication techniques, and developed a process for prefabricated individual homes. In 1965, Balency et Schuhl was purchased by Pont-à-Mousson. Alongside GTBA, it helped create SOBEA, which later became Sogea.

Management

Amédée Alby ( Chairman from 1908 à 1932)

1908

Worksite

Lighting for the Salon de l'Automobile

1908

SDEL
In the early XXth century, France was enthralled by the miracle of electricity. All exhibitions and popular events used electricity in their decor. Saunier Duval (the future SDEL) was already one of the most innovative specialists in the sector.

Company

GTBA

1907

Founded in 1907 by Maurice Tricon, a pioneer of reinforced concrete, GTBA (Grands Travaux en Béton Armé) often worked with Auguste Perret on projects such as the public works museum in Paris (now the Economic and Social Council building) and the reconstruction of Le Havre. The company's second chairman, the son of the founder, Paul-Maurice Tricon-Dunois, was unusual in that he was both an Army general and an entrepreneur in civil engineering. In 1965, Pont-à-Mousson acquired GTBA to add a construction division to SOBEA, the future Sogea.

Company

SDEL

1907

Charles Saunier, a graduate of Ecole Polytechnique, and Maurice Duval created Saunier Duval et Compagnie in 1907. The company kept its name until 1990. Charles Saunier was a former manager of Bengel Frères, a manufacturer of public heating and lighting systems, especially gas-powered. The new company focused on exactly the same sectors and won prestigious contracts, providing lighting for automobile and aviation trade fairs at the Grand Palais in Paris and for the 1931 colonial exhibition.
Saunier Duval diversified into the manufacturing of water heaters and gas powered heaters. After World War II, Saunier Duval opened several branches and acquired leading players in the gas and electricity sectors.
The company gradually reorganised around several industrial activities (gas, bathroom installations, public lighting, electrical engineering and industrial automation systems). After becoming a subsidiary of Saint-Gobain, Saunier Duval became part of SGE in 1985. Today it is a subsidiary of GTIE.

Management

Général Tricon-Dunois (1896-1996)

1907

The son of GTBA's founder, Tricon-Dunois was unusual in that he was both a general and an entrepreneur. In 1940, he fled to London to join the Free French under General Charles de Gaulle. Appointed to General Leclerc, he was actively involved in rallying the African colonies to the cause, before taking part in operations in Italy, as well as in the liberation of Marseille and Strasbourg. His military career ended in Germany after the fall of the Reich.

Company

Tunzini

1906

Tunzini, a company specialised in heating equipment, was founded by Ernest Tunzini in 1906. Tunzini designed the heating systems of the Printemps department store in Paris, and then went on to promote the advantages of ventilation systems, before becoming a pioneer of air conditioning technology. In the 1950s, the family company became international and entered industrial air conditioning markets abroad.
In 1966, after sixty years as Chairman, Ernest Tunzini retired and sold his company to Pont-à-Mousson. From then on, Tunzini underwent two major mergers, in 1968 with Améliorair (an aero thermal company founded in 1935) and in 1976 with climate control specialist Nessi. Tunzini became Tunzini Nessi Entreprises d’Equipements (TNEE). In 1985, it became a subsidiary of SGE, shortly after the latter's acquisition by Saint-Gobain Pont-à-Mousson.
The company was then renamed Tunzini, and in the 1990s, it reinforced its positions in thermal equipment, notably for climate control and fire protection. In March 2000, the thermal mechanics division, which included G+H Montage, a major player in the German insulation market, was transferred to GTIE, VINCI's Energy and Information division.

Company

Thinet

1905

Thinet was founded in 1905 in Saint-Romain-le-Puy, a small town of the Loire region. The founder, Antoine Thinet, developed a strong regional business base, which later enabled the company to expand nationwide, as of 1936, under the founder's son, Marcel Thinet. The latter implemented two principles of modern management: site planning and industrialisation. Under his leadership, Thinet moved to Paris and built several subsidised housing projects in the Saint-Denis and Suresnes suburbs. It also worked on the Achères water treatment plant and opened an office in Abidjan.
In 1965, Thinet became an SGE subsidiary to increase its financial clout. It's performance was excellent until the early 1980s, when it encountered serious financial problems. SGE decided to keep only the activities in southern France and to integrate them to Sogea.

Event

Creation of SGE

1899

Marconi invents the wireless signal, the precursor of the radio.

Company

Brüggemann

1899

Franz Brüggemann, a construction engineer, founded the Brüggemann company in Duisberg, Germany in 1899. The company did fairly well at first, but did not truly take off until after World War II, when it participated in the reconstruction of major German infrastructure, such as the Breidenbacher Hof hotel in Dusseldorf. Brüggemann won a strong reputation as a reliable partner in civil engineering projects, especially maritime and river infrastructure and prefabricated industrial structures. It also strengthened its international presence, especially in Arab countries. In the 1970s, Brüggemann increased its expertise in construction and civil engineering, major infrastructure and turnkey projects. In 1992, Campenon Bernard Construction (CBC) purchased an interest in the company. Five years later, CBC became part of SGE. Since then, Brüggemann's future has been closely linked to that of SGE, now the VINCI group.

Company

SGE

1899

Foundation of SGE
In 1899, Alexandre Giros et Louis Loucheur, engineers and graduates of Ecole Polytechnique, founded a civil engineering company, which soon became SGE (Société Générale D'Entreprise). Thanks to buoyant markets in electricity and railway construction, the company was an immediate success. By 1910, SGE was the second-largest company in the sector. During the first world war, the group focused on national defence projects. After the war, despite a sometimes difficult environment, it continued to grow, participating in major projects such as the Truyère and Drac sites. The company was hard hit by World War II and forced to abandon its positions in the colonies. In 1946, SGE was confronted with the French government's decision to nationalise electrical power.

A leader in civil engineering
Under the management of Jean Matheron and Paul Huvelin, Alexandre Giros's sons-in-law, SGE redeployed massively into civil engineering. In projects such as the Génissiat and Bin-el-Ouidane dams and the Rance tidal power plant, SGE demonstrated significant technical expertise, and established itself as the unrivalled leader in the profession. SGE was taken over by Compagnie Générale d’Electricité (now Alcatel). In 1966, it took part in the creation of Cofiroute. In 1982, it merged with Sainrapt et Brice. From 1984 to 1988, the company was part of Saint-Gobain before it was taken over by Compagnie Générale des Eaux (now Vivendi). When SGE merged with Campenon Bernard, also a holding company, it kept its name and legal identity. All of these transactions radically changed SGE's profile, turning it into a holding company with many subsidiaries.

From SGE to VINCI
In the early 1990s, SGE launched several takeovers to reinforce its position in Europe. In 1997, it exchanged household waste treatment and water distribution activities for CGE's (Vivendi) electrical engineering business (GTIE). SGE was thus able to reorganise around four divisions: Construction, Energy and Information, Roads and Concessions. The year 2000 saw several major changes: following Vivendi's withdrawal, SGE became an independent company and changed its name to VINCI. In the second half of 2000, VINCI's successful bid for GTM made it the world leader in the sector, ahead of Skanska of Sweden and Bouygues of France.

Management

Alexandre Giros (Founder and Chairman, 1932-1937)

1899

Alexandre Giros was born in 1870 and studied at Ecole Polytechnique. In 1899, he teamed up with former Polytechnique classmate Louis Loucheur to found SGE. Alexandre Giros helped promote the use of reinforced concrete and was one of the founders of a business organisation of reinforced concrete companies in 1903.
Giros was also a leading player in the electrical power sector in the XXth century and was active in at least thirteen different companies. In all of his functions, and at SGE, he always applied bold labour policies, but without ever playing a political role, contrary to Louis Loucheur.
Named commander of the Legion of Honor in 1934, he always upheld the values of hard work and family duty. Through his daughters Denise and Madeleine, who respectively married Jean Matheron and Paul Huvelin, two future SGE leaders, the Giros family continued to control the company for a long time after Alexandre Giros's death in 1937.

Event

Creation of GTM

1891

Michelin files a patent for the removable tire.

Company

GTM

1891

The birth of a leader
Grands Travaux de Marseille (GTM) was created in Marseille in 1891 by local businessmen to equip the city with a modern sewage system. The work was carried out by Charles Rebuffel, who turned GTM into a leader in French civil engineering. Until 1914, the company recorded steady growth, driven by diversification into new technologies (electrical works, harbour construction and underground structures) and by foreign markets. The war weakened GTM's position and forced it to refocus on industrial construction and electrical works. Efforts to redeploy continued throughout the roaring twenties. During that period, GTM was very successful in the French colonies. Thanks to its presence abroad, the company was less affected by World War II. During the war, it built several electrical facilities (e.g. the Génissiat dam) and carried out projects for the occupation forces.

The post-war boom
The first sites of the post-war reconstruction period allowed GTM to recover quickly. But the group was confronted with the challenge of decolonisation. To sustain growth, GTM relied on its ability to innovate, as reflected in the Havana tunnels and the Savines bridge. As of 1957, under the chairmanship of René Gonon, the company won several contracts in Africa, and notably took part in saving the Abu Simbel temple, in work on the Nile river, and in projects in North and South America and the Middle East. GTM diversified into offshore oil structures, nuclear power plants, and concessions, through parking lots and Cofiroute. GTM succeeded in keeping its historical businesses, while adding new ones.

The age of alliances
In 1982, GTM merged with Entrepose, a company created in 1935 by metallurgist groups, with which GTM had a long-standing partnership. Entrepose contributed complementary businesses and markets, like underground pipe systems and drilling and sounding activities. Entrepose enabled GTM to expand in the Middle East and Latin America. Yet when orderbooks from emerging countries began to shrink, GTM-Entrepose was forced to retrench to European markets. Fortunately, the French market offered many opportunities. GTM-Entrepose was general contractor for the Georges Pompidou Centre and the La Villette science park. In 1987, Dumez acquired an interest in GTM-Entrepose. As of 1994, Dumez and GTM-Entrepose began considering a merger of their construction and civil engineering activities. The merger became effective two years later. The new entity, called Groupe GTM, became part of the VINCI group in 2001.

Company

Dumez

1890

From metal frames to reinforced concrete (1890-1944)

In 1890, the year Gustave Eiffel finished building the tower named after him, Alexandre Dumez created a company specialised in metal frames. The first world war forced the company to refocus on reinforced concrete. This decision was strengthened with the arrival of Pierre Chaufour, soon joined by his brother André, to head the company. Under their leadership, the Dumez company acquired a lasting foothold in Africa.

The breakthrough (1944-1972)
Thanks to the post-war boom and the surge in housing, the company recorded strong growth in metropolitan France. Even so, Dumez's most spectacular achievements were in Africa and soon afterwards in other continents. The Nebeur dam in Tunisia became a symbol of national pride, the Dokan dam in Iraq strengthened Dumez's international reputation, and with the Hendrik Verwoerd site, Dumez broke existing records in dam construction

A powerful group (1972 -2000)
Organised around several strong subsidiaries, the Dumez group did not suffer from the recession and won several prestigious contracts, including the Yamoussoukro basilica, the new Ministry of Finance in Paris, and the Grand Louvre. Dumez acquired an interest in Chantiers Modernes and, in 1989, bought CFE, the historical leader of the Belgian construction market. Dumez merged with Lyonnaise des Eaux and with GTM, before joining the VINCI group.

Management

Alexandre Dumez (1864-1932)

1890

A graduate of Ecole Centrale, Alexandre Dumez soon created his own company. In his desire to become the new Gustave Eiffel, he initially specialised in metal frames but was forced to refocus on reinforced concrete, a business for which he showed considerable skill. He found the ideal successor in his son-in-law Pierre Chaufour.

Company

Deschiron

1885

Deschiron was founded in 1885 by Gaston Deschiron, a native of the Creuse region in central France, and operated as a family company. From the start, it developed a fairly diversified business base. Deschiron built several bridges and took part in the construction of the Maginot line. After the second world war, it worked for industry, including steel works and electrical utility EDF(e.g. the Gerstheim falls on the Alsace canal and the Arrighi power plant). SGE acquired an interest in the company in 1958. From then on, Deschiron specialised in earthmoving and made a vital contribution to transport infrastructure projects. In 1982, following the family's withdrawal, Deschiron became a fully-owned subsidiary of SGE. Initially, the company was part of Sogea, but as of 1992, it was integrated into Campenon Bernard.

Management

Louis Mors (1855-1917)

1885

A graduate of Ecole Centrale in Paris Louis Mors was fascinated by new technologies. He founded a publication specialised in electricity. With his brother, he also designed a new sports car. Mors was also a gifted chemist and a patron of the arts. He helped create a chair in Musicology at the Collège de France.

Event

Creation of Dumez

1880

Tahiti becomes a French colony.

Company

CFE

1880

CCFE was created in Belgium in 1880, under the impetus of Victor Tercelin-Monjot and Frédéric de la Hault, a Belgian entrepreneur specialised in tramway construction.
The company's initial name (Compagnie Générale de Chemins de Fer Secondaires) reflected its focus on regional railways and tramway systems. Soon management started to concentrate on international development and the company was awarded projects on the trans-Iranian railway. The Belgian Congo also became one of its key markets until the country's independence in 1960. International expansion together with increased diversification enabled CFE to withstand the effects of decolonisation.
In 1981, CFE purchased Entreprises Ed. François et fils, a company founded in 1868, and became the largest construction company in Belgium. Six years later, in 1987, Dumez acquired an interest in CFE, which still had a strong presence in the Benelux, Africa and the Middle East. CFE was notably sustained by its powerful dredging subsidiary, which was called DEME (Dredging Environmental and Maritime Engineering) in 1991. VINCI holds 45.25% in CFE, which remains the leader in the Belgian construction market.

Event

Creation of Etablissements Gibault, Sogea's predecessor

1878

Edison invents the phonograph.

Company

Sogea

1878

A former subsidiary of Pont-à-Mousson
The story of Eau et Assainissement (the ancestor of Sogea) began in 1878, under the name Etablissements Charles Gibaut. The company did not take the name Eau et Assainissement until 1918, when Pont-à-Mousson decided to add water treatment activities to its traditional foundry business. From the start, Eau et Assainissement was present throughout France, notably in Paris (where it built pipes to supply the city with water from the Voulzie river), Bordeaux and Caen.
It also developed a strong presence in Africa. In 1925, for example, it won a contract to pipe water from the Bou Redine river to Bone in Algeria. A widespread geographical presence helped the group survive the second world war. But Algerian independence in 1961 hastened Eau et Assainissement's merger with Socoman, another Pont-à-Mousson subsidiary with the same chairman and directors.

Pipes and civil engineering
The new company, called Socea, began to diversify under the management of Jacques Lesage. In 1979, it merged with Pont-à-Mousson's construction businesses, Balency-et-Schuhl and GTBA, which had already been merged under the name Balency-Briard. In 1986, the new company, called Sobea, merged with SGE's construction and civil engineering business, and became Sogea, a subsidiary of SGE, now the VINCI group. In France and abroad, through its many subsidiaries, Sogea took part in several projects, such as the Nice airport or the hydraulic and a water treatment plant in Lagos

Company

Dodin

1865

Although Dodin's origins date back to 1865, the company did not begin to play a major role in maritime and river works until the 1920s. From then on, Abel Dodin, son of the founder, decided to make the company a specialist in these areas.
Dodin enjoyed a strong presence in western France and took advantage of the post-war boom to move into the Paris region, where it carried out work on the Seine and Marne rivers, before moving into the rest of France and abroad. At the beginning of the 1970s, it won a major market to build the Mina Sulman port in Bahrain.
In 1983, Dodin became a subsidiary of the Saint-Gobain group and, later, a subsidiary of Sogea.

Company

Sainrapt et Brice

1852

Sainrapt et Brice was created in two stages. In 1852, Michel Sainrapt set up a company specialised in consolidation works and special foundations. Upon his death, he was succeeded by his daughter-in-law. In 1901, she teamed up with a young engineer named Alexis Brice, who had been recruited by Michel Sainrapt, to create Sainrapt et Brice. Though Sainrapt et Brice remained a family-owned company, it reported strong growth, thanks to effective use of reinforced concrete, as demonstrated by the construction of the Banque de France branch in Caen in 1922.
During World War II, Sainrapt et Brice chose collaboration with the Germans. Louis-Pierre Brice, Alexis Brice's heir, who was chairman during the war years, was banned from running the company for several years. Sainrapt et Brice, however, was allowed to continue to operate and was awarded major work in the port of Dunkirk in 1947. In the 1950s, it installed electrical power facilities at the Carla falls on the Agout river near Castre.
Sainrapt et Brice successfully expanded in France's overseas territories. The company recorded its greatest successes in Africa, through subsidiary Satom. Satom reported strong growth, while the parent company Sainrapt et Brice suffered a deep recession. Sainrapt et Brice was purchased by Devars-Naudo and merged with SGE in 1981.

Company

Mors

1851

Mors, founded in 1851 by a Parisian craftsman, always embraced the latest technologies. The company started out as a specialist in electrical equipment, then focused on railway signals. At the beginning of the XXth century, it moved into automobile construction. Mors's chairmen were Louis and Eugène Mors, the latter a pioneer of the automotive industry, on a par with other great names, such as Bollé, Clément and Michelin.
Mors moved into electrical appliances and even developed a scooter model. It did not decide to focus once and for all on electrical installations until the 1960s. Mors then merged with Jean et Bouchon, a company specialised in electrical installations based in eastern France, and became MJB (Mors Jean Bouchon).
In 1970, holding company UEER brought together Garczynski Traploir, MJB and Fournié-Grospaud. In 1984, after merging with MJB, UEER became GTIE (Générale de Travaux et d’Installations Electriques), the VINCI group's Energy and Information division.

Event

Creation of Maison Jean et Chabrié

1817

Banque Rothschild opens in Paris.

Company

Maison Jean et Chabrié

1817

Jean et Chabrié is the VINCI group's oldest company, and a subsidiary of GTIE, VINCI's Energy and Information branch. Jean et Chabrié was awarded its first contract in 1817, under Louis the XVIIIth. The contract consisted in providing candles and firewood to light and heat the Assemblée Nationale building in Paris.